Pain Medicine

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  Photo of Dr. Mario De Pinto and medical student discussing acute pain management

Welcome to the UCSF Pain Medicine Website hosted by the Division of Pain Medicine in the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care.

This website provides a bridge linking the expertise of our UCSF pain medicine teams and educators to our patients and other health care providers. UCSF is developing innovative pain care pathways to ensure continuity of pain management from inpatient to outpatient for both children and adults. For more information, we invite you to explore the links at the left side of the page, or find our contact information below. Thank you for visiting our site.

Mark A. Schumacher, PhD, MD

Chief, Division of Pain Medicine

Contact Us

Outpatient Pain Management Center Contact Information

Clinical Phone: 415-885-PAIN (7246)

General Clinical Fax: 415-885-7575

New Patient Referral Fax: 415-885-3883

Administrative Contact Information

Morgen Ahearn

Assistant to Mark Schumacher, PhD, MD 

Phone: 415-476-4244

Academic Fax: 415-476-9516 (Please do not send Protected Health Information to this fax.)

 

About Us

Mission of the Division of Pain Medicine at UCSF

Portrait of Dr. Mark Schumacher, Chief of the Division of Pain Medicine in the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care at UCSFAs our understanding of the mechanisms driving acute and chronic pain continue to develop, so too are the number of options available to effectively treat painful conditions.

However, effective pain management is not simply applying all possible therapeutic choices at once, but rather establishing a diagnosis through expert evaluation, providing evidence–based treatment options and allowing for meaningful follow up to ensure improved function and quality of life. In the majority of cases, such effective pain management utilizes an integrated team approach. The UCSF Pain Medicine Website provides a bridge linking the expertise of our UCSF pain medicine teams and educators to our patients and other health care providers in need of additional pain management resources. 

Driven by a sense of urgency and our public mission, UCSF is advancing health by developing innovative pain care pathways that ensure continuity of pain management from inpatient to outpatient for both children and adults. This involves breaking down traditional boundaries through the integration of pain management care, education and research to ensure the best quality, safety and satisfaction for our patients. For more information, we invite you to explore the links at the left of the page. 

Contact Us

Clinical Contact Information Administrative Contact Information

Pain Management Center

Clinical Phone: 415-885-PAIN (7246)

General Clinical Fax: 415-885-7575

New Patient Referral Fax: 415-885-3883

Morgen Ahearn

Assistant to Mark Schumacher, MD, PhD

Anesthesia Pain Medicine Division Administrator

Phone: 415-476-4244

Fax: 415-476-9516 (No Protected Health Information)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty and Providers

Pain Leadership

Mark Schumacher, PhD, MD 
Professor, Anesthesia 
Chief, Division of Pain Medicine
Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care

Acute Pain Faculty

Professor and Director, Inpatient
Pain Services, UCSF Health
Director, Inpatient Acute Pain Service 
 
Christopher Abrecht, MD
Assistant Clinical Professor, Anesthesia
Associate Director, Inpatient Pain Services
Director, Inpatient Chronic Pain Service 
 

Daniel Burkhardt, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia 
Director, Moffitt-Long Prepare Clinic

Lee-lynn Chen, MD 
Health Science Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Mario De Pinto, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia 
Director, Pain Management Center (Outpatient Chronic Pain Service) 

Sakura Kinjo, MD 
Health Science Clinical Professor 
Medical Director, Orthopaedic Institute

Merlin D. Larson, MD 
Clinical Professor - Emeritus, Anesthesia

Solmaz Manuel, MD 
Assistant Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Thoha Pham, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Mark Schumacher, PhD, MD 
Professor, Anesthesia 
Chief, Division of Pain Medicine,
Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care
 

Claas Siegmueller, MD, PhD, MBA 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia

C. Spencer Yost, MD 
Clinical Professor, Anesthesia 
Chief of Anesthesia, ICU Medical Director, UCSF-Bakar Cancer Hospital at Mission Bay

Chronic Pain and Pain Management Center Faculty

Mario De Pinto, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia 
Director, Pain Management Center (Outpatient Chronic Pain Service) 

Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia 
Director, UCSF Pain Medicine Fellowship Program
 
Christopher Abrecht, MD 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia
Director, Inpatient Chronic Pain Service
 
Nu "Cindy" Chai, MD 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia and Neurology
 

Zhonghui Guan, MD 
Assistant Professor in Residence, Anesthesia

Melanie M. Henry, MD, MPH 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

David J. Lee, MD 
Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Thoha Pham, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Lawrence Poree, MPH, MD, PhD 
Professor, Director, Neuromodulation Service

Heidi Reetz, MD 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia and Family & Community Medicine

Michael Rowbotham, MD 
Professor

Ann Cai Shah, MD 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia

Prasad Shirvalkar, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia

Xiaobing Yu, MD 
Assistant Professor in Residence, Anesthesia
 

Integrated Pediatric Pain & Palliative Care (IP3) Faculty

Amber Borucki, MD 
Assistant Professor, Director, Pediatric Anesthesia Pain

Gabriel Sarah, MD 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia Pain

Karen Sun, MD 
Assoc Clin Prof, Pediatric Hospital Medicine 
Chief, Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine 
Member, IP3 Governance Board

Steve Wilson, MD, PhD 
Clinical Professor, Pediatric Hosp Med 
Assoc Chief Medical Officer, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital

Maurice Zwass, MD 
Professor of Clinical Anesthesia, Anesthesia 
Director, Pediatric Anesthesia

Atsuko Baba, MD 
Clinical Professor, Pediatric Anesthesia 
Member, IP3 Governance Board

Marla Ferschl, MD 
Associate Professor, 
Director, Pediatric Anesthesia Fellowship Program

Darren Fiore, MD 
Associate Professor, Pediatrics 
Fellowship Director, Pediatric Hospital Medicine 
Director, Peds Hosp Med Fellowship Program

Audrey Foster-Barber, MD, PhD 
Associate Professor, Clinical Neurology

Sunitha Kaiser, MD, MSc 
Assistant Professor, Pediatrics 
IP3

Cynthia Kim, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Hung Gia Nguyen, MD 
Assistant Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Thomas Reid, MD 
Asst Clin Prof, Hospital Medicine 
Assoc Prog Dir, UCSF Hospice & Palliative Medicine Fellowship

David Robinowitz, MD, MHS, MS 
Associate Clinical Professor, Pediatric Anesthesia

Glenn Rosenbluth, MD, MSc 
Associate Professor, Pediatrics Director, Quality and Safety Programs GME Associate Director, Pediatrics Residency Training Program 
IP3

Psychology Faculty

Cristina Benki, PhD 
Child and Adolescent Psychologist, IP3

Valerie Jackson, PhD, MPH
Pain Psychologist, PMC

Regional Anesthesia Faculty

Pedram Aleshi, MD 
Associate Professor,
Anesthesia, Director, Regional Anesthesia

Christopher Abrecht, MD
Assistant Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Matthias Behrends, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Philip Bickler, MD, PhD 
Professor, Anesthesia

Matthias Braehler, MD, PhD 
Associate Professor

Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia 
Director, UCSF Pain Management Center 

Gerald Dubowitz, MD 
Associate Professor, Anesthesia

Seema Gandhi, MD 
Associate Professor, Anesthesia

Christina Inglis-Arkell, MD 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia
Director, MZ OR

Sakura Kinjo, MD 
Health Science Clinical Professor 
Medical Director, Orthopaedic Institute

Kerstin Kolodzie, MD, PhD 
Associate Professor, Anesthesia

George Pasvankas, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia 
Director, UCSF Pain Medicine Fellowship Program

Thoha Pham, MD 
Associate Clinical Professor, Anesthesia

Ahmed Shalabi, MD 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia

Claas Siegmueller, MD, PhD, MBA 
Assistant Professor, Anesthesia

Pain Fellows

Scott Grubb, MD 
2018-2019 Pain Management Fellow, Anesthesia 

Kasra Maasumi, MD, MS
2018-2019 Pain Management Fellow, Anesthesia 

Annie Park, MD 
2018-2019 Pain Management Fellow, Anesthesia 

Alec Peniche, MD 
2018-2019 Pain Management Fellow, Anesthesia 

Paul Su, MD 
2018-2019 Pain Management Fellow, Anesthesia 

Pain Nursing

Ada Edwards, NP

Nurse Practitioner, PMC

Charlene Michelle Gibson, RN 
Clinical Nurse, PMC 

Alicia Heilman, RN 
Outpatient Case Manager, 
IP3

Charmaine Penaflor, RN 
Clinical Nurse, PMC 

Heather Taylor, RN 
PMC 

Erica Fuchs, RN 
PMC 

Pain Staff

Dennis Lew, RN 
Administrative Director, UCSF Pain Management Center

Diane Ozawa 
Practice Supervisor, PMC 
Practice Assistant to Drs. Mario De Pinto and Ramana Naidu

Lisa Purser, RN 
Patient Care Manager, IP3 

Morgen Ahearn 
Assistant to Dr. Mark Schumacher, Anesthesia 
Administrator, Division of Pain Medicine

Tonia Broden-Gonzales 
Practice Assistant to Drs. George Pasvankas and Thoha Pham, PMC 

Helen Chin 
Practice Coordinator

Jason Diaz 
Medical Assistant

Marie Hollero 
Pain Fellowship Coordinator

Lona Hermawan 
Practice Assistant, PMC 

Matthew Jaime-Reyes 
Medical Assistant

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Kai the Dog 
Therapy Dog, IP3

Danielle Koehne 
Practice Coordinator 

Noemi Martinez 
Practice Coordinator - Front Desk

Shanda Vaughn 
Practice Assistant to Dr. Zhonghui Guan, PMC 

Robert Waymack 
Practice Assistant - New Patient Coordinator, PMC 
 

Make an Appointment

Make an Appointment

New Adult Patients
Need a referral or consultation request submitted by their primary physician or care team, for:
Chronic Pain Management
Acute Pain Management

Returning Adult Patients
Call the UCSF Pain Management Center at (415) 885-PAIN (7246) or
Request your follow-up appointment via UCSF MyChart, an online resource for your routine healthcare needs. 

Pediatric Patients
Caregivers can call the Integrated Pediatric Pain & Palliative Care (IP3) Clinic at (415) 353-1328

Locations

Outpatient Clinics

2255 Post Street (cross-street is Divisadero)
UCSF Mount Zion Campus
San Francisco, CA 94143
 
 
 
 
 
UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building
Integrated Pediatric Pain & Palliative Care Clinics
1825 Fourth Street, Fifth floor, 5A
UCSF Mission Bay Campus
San Francisco, CA 94143-0106
 

 

 

 

Inpatient Locations

     Photo of Mission Bay Hospitals on a clear sunny day
UCSF Helen Diller Medical Center, Parnassus       UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay                    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Related Clinics & Centers

Photo of the Other Center for Integrative Medicine Building at the UCSF Mount Zion CampusThe UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine provides several non-pharmaceutical pain management services that can be integrated with the Pain Management Center's services, whether your pain condition is acute or chronic. Treatments that we offer are supported by scientific studies for pain management, and include:

          

 

 

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Resources for Patients

Services

The Division of Pain Medicine, in partnership with our colleagues, provides pain care pathways to ensure outstanding pain care from inpatient to outpatient settings for both children and adults. See below for details.

Adult Pain Medicine

Outpatient Chronic Pain Management Center Clinic
Established in 1987 by the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, the PMC helps patients with various stages and types of complex, acute, and chronic pain. We offer a variety of treatment options with a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach.

Our Center, located at the UCSF Mount Zion campus, provides pain treatment for a wide variety of conditions, including but not limited to the conditions listed below.

Click the links below to get more details about these conditions and the treatments we offer for each.

Pain Psychology Services
Biofeedback
Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment
Family Education and Support
Group Psychotherapy
Health Psychology
Individual Psychotherapy
Interdisciplinary Management Of Chronic Pain Syndromes
Psychological Evaluation
Psychological Treatment
Stress Management

 

Inpatient Acute and Chronic Pain Services

The Acute and Chronic Pain Services at the Moffitt-Long, Mission Bay, and Mount Zion Hospitals serve as consultant services for our medicine and surgical colleagues who request our help with acute or chronic pain management. For these patients, we make evidence-based recommendations in collaboration with our colleagues, and a final plan for pain management is implemented.

We assess each patient's overall medical condition in the context of an acute or chronic pain episode or acute on chronic pain history. Our goal is to reduce pain while improving function, thus improving morbidity and mortality and decreasing length of stay. In addition, utilization of multimodal analgesia, including peripheral nerve and neuraxial catheters for adult and pediatric patients represents a frequently used technique to achieve such evidence-based goals.

The Acute and Chronic Inpatient Pain Services are available 24/7.

Pediatric Pain Medicine

Integrated Pediatric Pain and Palliative Care Program (IP3)

IP3 is a combined service staffed with pediatric anesthesiologists, pediatric integrative pain specialists, and pediatric palliative care specialists, including nurse practitioners and resident physicians functioning as a cohesive team.

At least one member of the IP3 team is available 24/7 to consult with the inpatient care team, and to initiate a pain and symptom management plan that applies the right management technique for the right child at the right time. Pediatric palliative care services include providing a model of care of hope and resources to support children and their families with life threatening and complex illnesses.

We also staff an outpatient pediatric pain practice, known as the Integrated Pediatric Pain and Palliative Care (IP3) Clinic, which includes symptom management of complex medical conditions.

See article in UCSF Leaps and Bounds:
Zapping the Pain

See article in UCSF News:
Acupuncture Helps Pediatric Patients Manage Pain and Nausea

UCSF is One of Few Academic Medical Centers to Offer Treatment to Inpatients and Outpatients

Osher Center Mini Medical School for the Public – Pain: New Insights and New (and Old) Treatments

February 11
BACK TO THE FUTURE OF PAIN MEDICINE
Mark Schumacher, PhD, MD
Professor and Chief, Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, UCSF

February 18
BEING “UNSYMPATHETIC”: PSYCHOLOGY’S SECRET WEAPON FOR MANAGING PAIN
Jessica Pullins, PhD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice

February 25
TECHNOLOGY VERSUS PAIN: TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY AND ELECTRICAL STIMULATION
Lawrence Poree, MD, PhD
Professor, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care; Director, Neuromodulation Service, UCSF

March 3
MY ACHING NECK - MY ACHING BACK
Mario De Pinto, MD
Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care; Director, Pain Management Center, UCSF

March 10
EAST MEETS WEST: ACUPUNCTURE AND BEYOND FOR ALL AGES
Sanjay Reddy, MD
Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine; Director, Congestive Heart Failure, Bone Marrow Transplant and Nighttime Hospitalist Services, UCSF

Pain Physician and Anesthesiologist, California Orthopedics & Spine; Medical Director of Pain Management for Marin General Hospital

Pain Psychology - Patient Education Videos

Instructions for Outpatient Pain Procedures

Link to Verbal Instructions (English)

Link to Written Instructions (English)

Other Resources

Please visit the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine website. The Osher Center offers a variety of groundbreaking lectures, classes, workshops, and therapeutic programs for the public.

Information about various conditions and treatments can be found on the UCSF Medical Center Patient Education page.

The NIH Pain Consortium website includes press releases and news about federal pain activities. You can also find a pain information brochure, indexing various National Institute of Health publications about pain symptoms, conditions and treatments. 

Disclaimer

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or health care provider. We encourage you to discuss with your doctor any questions or concerns you may have.

For Providers | Refer a Patient

Anesthesia Pain Faculty and Resident Clinical Schedule Assignments

Please click here for the Anesthesia Pain Services Clinical Assignments, now on QGenda.

IP3 Call Schedule

The IP3 Call Schedule is available on Amion.com.

Contact Us

Moffitt Long Hospital Pain Services Phone Numbers
Acute Pain Pager
(415) 443‑6889
Chronic Pain Pager
(415) 443‑4332
Acute Pain Resident ASCOM Day-Time Phone
(415) 514‑6593

Mission Bay Adult Hospitals Pain Services Phone Numbers

Adult Pain Pager
(415) 443‑2676 (voalte 20450)
IP3 (Pedi Pain) Pager
(415) 443‑6100 (voalte 514‑9500)

How to Refer a Patient

Non-UCSF Referring Providers
Please complete the UCSF Pain Referral and fax to us at (415) 885-3883.

UCSF Referring Providers

Please complete a referral within APeX.

Services Available

 

Related Clinics & Centers

The Osher Center for Integrative Medicine provides complementary non-pharmacological pain services that can be integrated with conventional medicine, including pharmacological approaches to pain. Integrative Medicine has much to contribute to the management of pain, whether acute or chronic, inpatient or outpatient. Our evidence-based integrative modalities, including acupuncture, mind-body medicine, and manual medicine, can help patients successfully manage their pain, while offering cost-effective alternatives and adjuncts to opiate and other pain medications.

Pain Management Resources at UCSF

2015 Resource Document

 

For Providers | Practice Guidelines

UCSF Practice Guidelines

Drug Information Summary-Nalbuphine
Please find the following documents on UCSF CareLinks:
Antithrombotics and Neuraxial Intervention 
Opioid Equivalence Table
UCSF Patient Provider Agreement Opioid Therapy
UCSF Pediatric- Patient Provider Agreement Opioid Therapy

UCSF Grand Rounds

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Combined Surgery and Anesthesia Grand Rounds
Prescribing Opioids in the Management of Chronic Pain

Osher Center Mini Medical School for the Public – Pain: New Insights and New (and Old) Treatments

February 11, 2016
BACK TO THE FUTURE OF PAIN MEDICINE
Mark Schumacher, PhD, MD
Professor and Chief, Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, UCSF

Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice
February 25, 2016
TECHNOLOGY VERSUS PAIN: TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY AND ELECTRICAL STIMULATION
Lawrence Poree, MD, PhD
Professor, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care; Director, Neuromodulation Service, UCSF

March 3, 2016
MY ACHING NECK - MY ACHING BACK
Mario De Pinto, MD
Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care; Director, Pain Management Center, UCSF

March 10, 2016
EAST MEETS WEST: ACUPUNCTURE AND BEYOND FOR ALL AGES
Sanjay Reddy, MD
Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine; Director, Congestive Heart Failure, Bone Marrow Transplant and Nighttime Hospitalist Services, UCSF

Pain Physician and Anesthesiologist, California Orthopedics & Spine; Medical Director of Pain Management for Marin General Hospital

Pain Summits

2015
Case 1 Presentations
Case 2 Presentations
Case 3 Presentations
Full Program

Date: May 8, 2015
Time: 8:00am-3:00pm
Location: Cole Hall, Millberry Union

Recorded Sessions:
Time: 8:45am Click to View
Time: 1:00pm Click to View

For more information, please contact: [email protected]

2013
Agenda
Pre- and Post-Test

2011
Agenda
Actions

EXTERNAL LINKS

American Pain Society (APS) Library - Clinical Practice Guidelines

International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) - Guidelines

World Institute of Pain (WIP)

American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pain Consortium

North American Neuromodulation Society (NANS)

American Academy of Pain Physician (AAPM)

American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)

PubMed - US National Library of Medicine

Recommended Reading

GENERAL

Deer TR, Leong MS. Comprehensive Treatment of Chronic Pain by Medical, Interventional, and Integrative Approaches. New York, NY: Springer; 2013.

 

Macintyre PE, Schug SA, Scott DA, Visser EJ, Walker SM; APM:SE Working Group of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain Medicine (2010), Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence (3rd edition), ANZCA & FPM, Melbourne.

 

Urman RD, Vadivelu N. Pocket Pain Medicine. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins; 2011.

 

ACUTE PAIN

Carr DB, Goudas LC. Acute Pain. The Lancet. 1999 353:2051-58.

 

Dolin SJ, Cashman JN. Tolerability of acute postoperative pain management: nausea, vomiting, sedation, pruritus, and urinary retention. Evidence from published data. Br J Anaesth. 2005 Nov;95(5):584-91.

 

Egbert LD, Battit GE, Welch CE, Bartlett MK. Reduction of postoperative pain by encouragement and instruction of patients. A study of doctor – patient rapport. N Engl J Med. 1964 Apr 16;270:825-7.

 

Gerbershagen HJ, Pogatzki-Zahn E, Aduckathil S, Peelen LM, Kappen TH, van Wijck AJ, Kalkman CJ, Meissner W. Procedure-specific risk factor analysis for the development of severe postoperative pain. Anesthesiology. 2014 May;120(5):1237-45.

 

Ingrande J, Lemmens HJ. Dose adjustment of anaesthetics in the morbidly obese. Br J Anaesth. 2010 Dec;105 Suppl 1:i16-23.

 

Møiniche S, Kehlet H, Dahl JB. A qualitative and quantitative systematic review of preemptive analgesia for postoperative pain relief: the role of timing of analgesia. Anesthesiology. 2002 Mar;96(3):725-41.

 

Moore RA, Derry S, McQuay HJ, Wiffen PJ. Single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Sep 7;(9):CD008659.

 

Practice Guidelines for Acute Pain Management in the Perioperative Setting: An Updated Report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Acute Pain Management. Anesthesiology. 2012 Feb;116(2):248-73.

 

Serpell MG, Makin A, Harvey A. Acute pain physiology and pharmacological targets: The present and future. Acute Pain. 1998 Jun;1(3):31-47.

 

Woolf CJ. Recent advances in the pathophysiology of acute pain. Br J Anaesth. 1989 Aug;63(2):139-46.

 

EPIDURAL

Arakawa M, Aoyama Y, Ohe Y. Block of the sacral segments in lumbar epidural anaesthesia. Br J Anaesth. 2003 Feb;90(2):173-8.

 

Asato F, Hirakawa N, Araki K, Nagasawa I, Uchiyama A, Watanabe N, Totoki T. A technique for obtaining successful sacral spread with continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia. Anesth Analg. 1990 Jun;70(6):662-4.

 

Choi S, Mahon P, Awad IT. Neuraxial anesthesia and bladder dysfunction in the perioperative period: a systematic review. Can J Anaesth. 2012 Jul;59(7):681-703.

 

Dam-Hieu P, Rodriguez V, De Cazes Y, Quinio B. Computed tomography images of entrapped epidural catheter. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2002 Sep-Oct;27(5):517-9.

 

Hogan Q. Distribution of solution in the epidural space: examination by cryomicrotome section. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):150-6.

 

Gallart L, Blanco D, Samsó E, Vidal F. Clinical and radiologic evidence of the epidural plica mediana dorsalis. Anesth Analg. 1990 Dec;71(6):698-701.

 

Hermanides J, Hollmann MW, Stevens MF, Lirk P. Failed epidural: causes and management. Br J Anaesth. 2012 Aug;109(2):144-54.

 

Hogan Q. Distribution of solution in the epidural space: examination by cryomicrotome section. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):150-6.

 

Park WY, Thompson JS, Lee KK. Effect of epidural anesthesia and analgesia on perioperative outcome: a randomized, controlled Veterans Affairs cooperative study. Ann Surg. 2001 Oct;234(4):560-9; discussion 569-71.

 

Pöpping DM, Elia N, Van Aken HK, Marret E, Schug SA, Kranke P, Wenk M, Tramèr MR. Impact of epidural analgesia on mortality and morbidity after surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Ann Surg. 2014 Jun;259(6):1056-67.

 

Ramsay N, Walker J, Tang R, Vaghadia H, Sawka A. Flexion-rotation manoeuvre increases dimension of the acoustic target window for paramedian thoracic epidural access. Br J Anaesth. 2014 Mar;112(3):556-62.

 

Renehan EM, Peterson RA, Penning JP, Rosaeg OP, Chow D. Visualization of a looped and knotted epidural catheter with a guidewire. Can J Anaesth. 2000 Apr;47(4):329-33.

 

Statlock Image:

 

Stevens DS, Balkany AD. Appearance of plica mediana dorsalis during epidurography. Pain Physician. 2006 Jul;9(3):268-70.

 

Wilson MJ, Macarthur C, Shennan A; COMET Study Group (UK). Urinary catheterization in labour with high-dose vs mobile epidural analgesia: a randomized controlled trial. Br J Anaesth. 2009 Jan;102(1):97-103.

 

Zaouter C, Kaneva P, Carli F. Less urinary tract infection by earlier removal of bladder catheter in surgical patients receiving thoracic epidural analgesia. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2009 Nov-Dec;34(6):542-8.

 

ANTISEPTICS

Hebl JR. The importance and implications of aseptic techniques during regional anesthesia. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2006 Jul-Aug;31(4):311-23.

 

Sviggum HP, Jacob AK, Arendt KW, Mauermann ML, Horlocker TT, Hebl JR. Neurologic complications after chlorhexidine antisepsis for spinal anesthesia. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2012 Mar-Apr;37(2):139-44.

 

CATHETER

Bouman EA, Gramke HF, Wetzel N, Vanderbroeck TH, Bruinsma R, Theunissen M, Kerkkamp HE, Marcus MA. Evaluation of two different epidural catheters in clinical practice. narrowing down the incidence of paresthesia! Acta Anaesthesiol Belg. 2007;58(2):101-5.

 

EPIDURAL ADJUVANTS

Baron CM, Kowalski SE, Greengrass R, Horan TA, Unruh HW, Baron CL. Epinephrine decreases postoperative requirements for continuous thoracic epidural fentanyl infusions. Anesth Analg. 1996 Apr;82(4):760-5.

 

Neal JM. Effects of epinephrine in local anesthetics on the central and peripheral nervous systems: Neurotoxicity and neural blood flow. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2003 Mar-Apr;28(2):124-34.

 

EPIDURAL INFECTION

American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques. Practice advisory for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques: a report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques. Anesthesiology. 2010 Mar;112(3):530-45.

 

Brookman CA, Rutledge ML. Epidural abscess: case report and literature review. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2000 Jul-Aug;25(4):428-31.

 

Du Pen SL, Peterson DG, Williams A, Bogosian AJ. Infection during chronic epidural catheterization: diagnosis and treatment. Anesthesiology. 1990 Nov;73(5):905-9.

 

Grewal S, Hocking G, Wildsmith JA. Epidural abscesses. Br J Anaesth. 2006 Mar;96(3):292-302.

 

Hebl JR, Horlocker TT. You're not as clean as you think! The role of asepsis in reducing infectious complications related to regional anesthesia. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;28(5):376-9.

 

Horlocker TT, Wedel DJ. Neurologic complications of spinal and epidural anesthesia. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2000 Jan-Feb;25(1):83-98.

 

Nickels JH, Poulos JG, Chaouki K. Risks of infection from short-term epidural catheter use. Reg Anesth. 1989 Mar-Apr;14(2):88-9.

 

Ruppen W, Derry S, McQuay H, Moore RA. Incidence of epidural hematoma, infection, and neurologic injury in obstetric patients with epidural analgesia/anesthesia. Anesthesiology. 2006 Aug;105(2):394-9.

 

Strafford MA, Wilder RT, Berde CB. The risk of infection from epidural analgesia in children: a review of 1620 cases. Anesth Analg. 1995 Feb;80(2):234-8.

 

EPIDURAL OPIOIDS

Bernards CM, Shen DD, Sterling ES, Adkins JE, Risler L, Phillips B, Ummenhofer W.  Epidural, cerebrospinal fluid, and plasma pharmacokinetics of epidural opioids (part 1): differences among opioids. Anesthesiology. 2003 Aug;99(2):455-65.

 

Flack SH, Anderson CM, Bernards C. Morphine distribution in the spinal cord after chronic infusion in pigs. Anesth Analg. 2011 Feb;112(2):460-4.

 

Ummenhofer WC, Arends RH, Shen DD, Bernards CM. Comparative spinal distribution and clearance kinetics of intrathecally administered morphine, fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil. Anesthesiology. 2000 Mar;92(3):739-53.

 

EPIDURAL FENTANYL

Ginosar Y, Riley ET, Angst MS. The site of action of epidural fentanyl in humans: the difference between infusion and bolus administration. Anesth Analg. 2003 Nov;97(5):1428-38.

 

Guinard JP, Carpenter RL, Chassot PG. Epidural and intravenous fentanyl produce equivalent effects during major surgery. Anesthesiology. 1995 Feb;82(2):377-82.

 

Loper KA, Ready LB, Downey M, Sandler AN, Nessly M, Rapp S, Badner N. Epidural and intravenous fentanyl infusions are clinically equivalent after knee surgery. Anesth Analg. 1990 Jan;70(1):72-5.

 

Privado MS, Issy AM, Lanchote VL, Garcia JB, Sakata RK. Epidural versus intravenous fentanyl for postoperative analgesia following orthopedic surgery: randomized controlled trial. Sao Paulo Med J. 2010 Jan;128(1):5-9.

 

KNOTTED CATHETER

Dam-Hieu P, Rodriguez V, De Cazes Y, Quinio B. Computed tomography images of entrapped epidural catheter. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2002 Sep-Oct;27(5):517-9.

 

David M. Knotted peripheral nerve catheter. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;28(5):487-8.

 

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

UCSF Medical Center, Department of Nursing, Nursing Procedures Manual, Epidural Analgesia (General), 2013.

 

ESSENTIAL ARTICLES

Basbaum AI, Bautista DM, Scherrer G, Julius D. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of pain. Cell. 2009 Oct 16;139(2):267-84.

 

GABAPENTINOIDS

Davies A, Hendrich J, Van Minh AT, Wratten J, Douglas L, Dolphin AC. Functional biology of the alpha(2)delta subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2007 May;28(5):220-8.

 

Schmidt PC, Ruchelli G, Mackey SC, Carroll IR. Perioperative gabapentinoids: choice of agent, dose, timing, and effects on chronic postsurgical pain. Anesthesiology. 2013 Nov;119(5):1215-21.

 

GABAPENTIN

Dirks J, Fredensborg BB, Christensen D, Fomsgaard JS, Flyger H, Dahl JB. A randomized study of the effects of single-dose gabapentin versus placebo on postoperative pain and morphine consumption after mastectomy. Anesthesiology. 2002 Sep;97(3):560-4.

 

Ho KY, Gan TJ, Habib AS. Gabapentin and postoperative pain--a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Pain. 2006 Dec 15;126(1-3):91-101.

 

Hurley RW, Cohen SP, Williams KA, Rowlingson AJ, Wu CL. The analgesic effects of perioperative gabapentin on postoperative pain: a meta-analysis. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2006 May-Jun;31(3):237-47.

 

Pandey CK, Priye S, Singh S, Singh U, Singh RB, Singh PK. Preemptive use of gabapentin significantly decreases postoperative pain and rescue analgesic requirements in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Can J Anaesth. 2004 Apr;51(4):358-63.

 

Rorarius MG, Mennander S, Suominen P, Rintala S, Puura A, Pirhonen R, Salmelin R, Haanpää M, Kujansuu E, Yli-Hankala A. Gabapentin for the prevention of postoperative pain after vaginal hysterectomy. Pain. 2004 Jul;110(1-2):175-81.

 

Stewart BH, Kugler AR, Thompson PR, Bockbrader HN. A saturable transport mechanism in the intestinal absorption of gabapentin is the underlying cause of the lack of proportionality between increasing dose and drug levels in plasma. Pharm Res. 1993 Feb;10(2):276-81.

 

Turan A, White PF, Karamanlioglu B, Memis D, Tasdogan M, Pamukçu Z, Yavuz E. Gabapentin: an alternative to the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for perioperative pain management. Anesth Analg. 2006 Jan;102(1):175-81.

 

PREGABALIN

Bornemann-Cimenti H, Lederer AJ, Wejbora M, Michaeli K, Kern-Pirsch C, Archan S, Rumpold-Seitlinger G, Zigeuner R, Sandner-Kiesling A. Preoperative pregabalin administration significantly reduces postoperative opioid consumption and mechanical hyperalgesia after transperitoneal nephrectomy. Br J Anaesth. 2012 May;108(5):845-9.

 

HISTORY

Cartwright PD, Helfinger RG, Howell JJ, Siepmann KK. Introducing an acute pain service. Anaesthesia. 1991 Mar;46(3):188-91.

 

Ready LB, Oden R, Chadwick HS, Benedetti C, Rooke GA, Caplan R, Wild LM. Development of an anesthesiology-based postoperative pain management service. Anesthesiology. 1988 Jan;68(1):100-6.

 

Werner MU, Søholm L, Rotbøll-Nielsen P, Kehlet H. Does an acute pain service improve postoperative outcome? Anesth Analg. 2002 Nov;95(5):1361-72, table of contents.

 

Wheatley RG, Madej TH, Jackson IJ, Hunter D. The first year's experience of an acute pain service. Br J Anaesth. 1991 Sep;67(3):353-9.

 

Zimmermann DL, Stewart J. Postoperative pain management and acute pain service activity in Canada. Can J Anaesth. 1993 Jun;40(6):568-75.

 

KETAMINE

Carroll IR, Angst MS, Clark JD. Management of perioperative pain in patients chronically consuming opioids. Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2004 Nov-Dec;29(6):576-91.

 

Domino EF. Taming the ketamine tiger. 1965. Anesthesiology. 2010 Sep;113(3):678-84.

 

Felsby S, Nielsen J, Arendt-Nielsen L, Jensen TS. NMDA receptor blockade in chronic neuropathic pain: a comparison of ketamine and magnesium chloride. Pain. 1996 Feb;64(2):283-91.

 

Hollmann MW, Liu HT, Hoenemann CW, Liu WH, Durieux ME. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by ketamine and magnesium. Part II: interactions with volatile anesthetics. Anesth Analg. 2001 May;92(5):1182-91.

 

Liu HT, Hollmann MW, Liu WH, Hoenemann CW, Durieux ME. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by ketamine and magnesium: Part I. Anesth Analg. 2001 May;92(5):1173-81.

 

Petrenko AB, Yamakura T, Baba H, Shimoji K. The role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in pain: a review. Anesth Analg. 2003 Oct;97(4):1108-16.

 

Rakhman E, Shmain D, White I, Ekstein MP, Kollender Y, Chazan S, Dadia S, Bickels J, Amar E, Weinbroum AA. Repeated and escalating preoperative subanesthetic doses of ketamine for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing tumor resection: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Clin Ther. 2011 Jul;33(7):863-73.

 

Remérand F, Le Tendre C, Baud A, Couvret C, Pourrat X, Favard L, Laffon M, Fusciardi J. The early and delayed analgesic effects of ketamine after total hip arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind study. Anesth Analg. 2009 Dec;109(6):1963-71.

 

Weinbroum AA. Non-opioid IV adjuvants in the perioperative period: pharmacological and clinical aspects of ketamine and gabapentinoids. Pharmacol Res. 2012 Apr;65(4):411-29.

 

ANTI-HYPERALGESIA

Bell RF. Low-dose subcutaneous ketamine infusion and morphine tolerance. Pain. 1999 Oct;83(1):101-3.

 

Bell RF, Dahl JB, Moore RA, Kalso E. Peri-operative ketamine for acute post-operative pain: a quantitative and qualitative systematic review (Cochrane review). Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Nov;49(10):1405-28.

 

De Kock M, Lavand'homme P, Waterloos H. 'Balanced analgesia' in the perioperative period: is there a place for ketamine? Pain. 2001 Jun;92(3):373-80.

 

Elia N, Tramèr MR. Ketamine and postoperative pain--a quantitative systematic review of randomised trials. Pain. 2005 Jan;113(1-2):61-70.

 

Himmelseher S, Durieux ME. Ketamine for perioperative pain management. Anesthesiology. 2005 Jan;102(1):211-20.

 

Lavand'homme P, De Kock M, Waterloos H. Intraoperative epidural analgesia combined with ketamine provides effective preventive analgesia in patients undergoing major digestive surgery. Anesthesiology. 2005 Oct;103(4):813-20.

 

Minville V, Fourcade O, Girolami JP, Tack I. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in a mice model of orthopaedic pain: preventive effect of ketamine. Br J Anaesth. 2010 Feb;104(2):231-8.

 

Urban MK, Ya Deau JT, Wukovits B, Lipnitsky JY. Ketamine as an adjunct to postoperative pain management in opioid tolerant patients after spinal fusions: a prospective randomized trial. HSS J. 2008 Feb;4(1):62-5.

 

MAGNESIUM

De Oliveira GS Jr, Castro-Alves LJ, Khan JH, McCarthy RJ. Perioperative systemic magnesium to minimize postoperative pain: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Anesthesiology. 2013 Jul;119(1):178-90.

 

Hollmann MW, Liu HT, Hoenemann CW, Liu WH, Durieux ME. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by ketamine and magnesium. Part II: interactions with volatile anesthetics. Anesth Analg. 2001 May;92(5):1182-91.

 

Liu HT, Hollmann MW, Liu WH, Hoenemann CW, Durieux ME. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by ketamine and magnesium: Part I. Anesth Analg. 2001 May;92(5):1173-81.

 

Petrenko AB, Yamakura T, Baba H, Shimoji K. The role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in pain: a review. Anesth Analg. 2003 Oct;97(4):1108-16.

 

Traynelis SF, Wollmuth LP, McBain CJ, Menniti FS, Vance KM, Ogden KK, Hansen KB, Yuan H, Myers SJ, Dingledine R. Glutamate receptor ion channels: structure, regulation, and function. Pharmacol Rev. 2010 Sep;62(3):405-96.

Wilder-Smith CH, Knöpfli R, Wilder-Smith OH. Perioperative magnesium infusion and postoperative pain. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1997 Sep;41(8):1023-7.

 

MULTIMODAL

Buvanendran A, Kroin JS. Multimodal analgesia for controlling acute postoperative pain. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2009 Oct;22(5):588-93.

 

Usichenko TI, Röttenbacher I, Kohlmann T, Jülich A, Lange J, Mustea A, Engel G, Wendt M. Implementation of the quality management system improves postoperative pain treatment: a prospective pre-/post-interventional questionnaire study. Br J Anaesth. 2013 Jan;110(1):87-95.

 

OPIOIDS

ALFENTANIL

Camu F, Gepts E, Rucquoi M, Heykants J. Pharmacokinetics of alfentanil in man. Anesth Analg. 1982 Aug;61(8):657-61.

 

Egan TD, Minto CF, Hermann DJ, Barr J, Muir KT, Shafer SL. Remifentanil versus alfentanil: comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in healthy adult male volunteers. Anesthesiology. 1996 Apr;84(4):821-33.

 

Persson MP, Nilsson A, Hartvig P. Pharmacokinetics of alfentanil in total i.v. anaesthesia. Br J Anaesth. 1988 Jun;60(7):755-61.

 

Shafer SL, Varvel JR. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and rational opioid selection. Anesthesiology. 1991 Jan;74(1):53-63.

 

Bujedo BM. Current evidence for spinal opioid selection in postoperative pain. Korean J Pain. 2014 Jul;27(3):200-9.

 

Clarke H, Soneji N, Ko DT, Yun L, Wijeysundera DN. Rates and risk factors for prolonged opioid use after major surgery: population based cohort study. BMJ. 2014 Feb 11;348:g1251.

 

BUTORPHANOL

Dawn AG, Yosipovitch G. Butorphanol for treatment of intractable pruritus. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2006 Mar;54(3):527-31.

 

Dunteman E, Karanikolas M, Filos KS. Transnasal butorphanol for the treatment of opioid-induced pruritus unresponsive to antihistamines. J Pain Symptom Manage. 1996 Oct;12(4):255-60.

 

Lee H, Naughton NN, Woods JH, Ko MC. Effects of butorphanol on morphine-induced itch and analgesia in primates. Anesthesiology. 2007 Sep;107(3):478-85.

 

CODEINE

Bradley CM, Nicholson AN. Effects of a mu-opioid receptor agonist (codeine phosphate) on visuo-motor coordination and dynamic visual acuity in man. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1986 Nov;22(5):507-12.

 

HYDROMORPHONE

Felden L, Walter C, Harder S, Treede RD, Kayser H, Drover D, Geisslinger G, Lötsch J. Comparative clinical effects of hydromorphone and morphine: a meta-analysis. Br J Anaesth. 2011 Sep;107(3):319-28.

 

Smith MT. Neuroexcitatory effects of morphine and hydromorphone: evidence implicating the 3-glucuronide metabolites. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2000 Jul;27(7):524-8.

 

Wright AW, Mather LE, Smith MT. Hydromorphone-3-glucuronide: a more potent neuro-excitant than its structural analogue, morphine-3-glucuronide. Life Sci. 2001 Jun 15;69(4):409-20.

 

ILEUS / CONSTIPATION

Becker G, Blum HE. Novel opioid antagonists for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction and postoperative ileus. Lancet. 2009 Apr 4;373(9670):1198-206.

 

Garten L, Degenhardt P, Bührer C. Resolution of opioid-induced postoperative ileus in a newborn infant after methylnaltrexone. J Pediatr Surg. 2011 Mar;46(3):e13-5.

 

Thomas J. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008 Jan;35(1):103-13.

 

METHADONE

Connock M, Juarez-Garcia A, Jowett S, Frew E, Liu Z, Taylor RJ, Fry-Smith A, Day E, Lintzeris N, Roberts T, Burls A, Taylor RS. Methadone and buprenorphine for the management of opioid dependence: a systematic review and economic evaluation. Health Technol Assess. 2007 Mar;11(9):1-171, iii-iv.

 

Eap CB, Déglon JJ, Baumann P. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacogenetics of Methadone: Clinical Relevance. Heroin Add & Rel Clin Probl. 1999;1(1):19-34.

 

Ferrari A, Coccia CP, Bertolini A, Sternieri E. Methadone--metabolism, pharmacokinetics and interactions. Pharmacol Res. 2004 Dec;50(6):551-9.

 

González-Barboteo J, Porta-Sales J, Sánchez D, Tuca A, Gómez-Batiste X. Conversion from parenteral to oral methadone. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2008;22(3):200-5.

 

Lipman AG. Methadone: a double edged sword. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2005;19(4):3-4.

 

Lugo RA, Satterfield KL, Kern SE. Pharmacokinetics of methadone. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2005;19(4):13-24.

 

Manfredi PL, Houde RW. Prescribing methadone, a unique analgesic. J Support Oncol. 2003 Sep-Oct;1(3):216-20.

 

McCance-Katz EF, Sullivan LE, Nallani S. Drug interactions of clinical importance among the opioids, methadone and buprenorphine, and other frequently prescribed medications: a review. Am J Addict. 2010 Jan-Feb;19(1):4-16.

 

Price LC, Wobeter B, Delate T, Kurz D, Shanahan R. Methadone for pain and the risk of adverse cardiac outcomes. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2014 Sep;48(3):333-42.e1.

 

Sharma A, Tallchief D, Blood J, Kim T, London A, Kharasch ED. Perioperative pharmacokinetics of methadone in adolescents. Anesthesiology. 2011 Dec;115(6):1153-61.

 

Toombs JD, Leavitt SB. Oral Methadone Dosing for Chronic Pain: A Practitioner’s Guide. Pain Topics.org. March 12, 2008.

 

Walker PW, Palla S, Pei BL, Kaur G, Zhang K, Hanohano J, Munsell M, Bruera E. Switching from methadone to a different opioid: what is the equianalgesic dose ratio? J Palliat Med. 2008 Oct;11(8):1103-8.

 

MORPHINE

Christrup LL. Morphine metabolites. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1997 Jan;41(1 Pt 2):116-22.

 

NALBUPHINE

Aitkenhead AR, Lin ES, Achola KJ. The pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous nalbuphine in healthy volunteers. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1988 Feb;25(2):264-8.

 

Friedman JD, Dello Buono FA. Opioid antagonists in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation and pruritus. Ann Pharmacother. 2001 Jan;35(1):85-91.

 

Gunion MW, Marchionne AM, Anderson CTM. Use of the mixed agonist – antagonist nalbuphine in opioid based analgesia. Acute Pain. 2004;6:29-39.

 

Jannuzzi R. Nalbuphine for the treatment of opioid-induced pruritus: a systematic review. J Pain. 2013 Apr;14(4):S10.

 

Liao CC, Chang CS, Tseng CH, Sheen MJ, Tsai SC, Chang YL, Wong SY. Efficacy of intramuscular nalbuphine versus diphenhydramine for the prevention of epidural morphine-induced pruritus after cesarean delivery. Chang Gung Med J. 2011 Mar-Apr;34(2):172-8.

 

Naidu RK. Drug Information Summary Sheet: Nalbuphine. September 17, 2012.

 

Szarvas S, Harmon D, Murphy D. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review. J Clin Anesth. 2003 May;15(3):234-9.

 

Yeh YC, Lin TF, Lin FS, Wang YP, Lin CJ, Sun WZ. Combination of opioid agonist and agonist-antagonist: patient-controlled analgesia requirement and adverse events among different-ratio morphine and nalbuphine admixtures for postoperative pain. Br J Anaesth. 2008 Oct;101(4):542-8.

 

P&T COMMITTEE

Nalbuphine for Opioid Induced Pruritus. UCSF P&T.

 

Nguyen N. Nalbuphine Monograph. UCSF P&T. July 2013.

 

Schumacher M, Naidu R. Nalbuphine Summary: Requesting Addition to Formulary for Treatment of Opioid Induced Pruritus. UCSF P&T. October 9, 2013.

 

NAUSEA

 

OIH

Angst MS, Clark JD. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a qualitative systematic review. Anesthesiology. 2006 Mar;104(3):570-87.

 

DuPen A, Shen D, Ersek M. Mechanisms of opioid-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia. Pain Manag Nurs. 2007 Sep;8(3):113-21.

 

Joly V, Richebe P, Guignard B, Fletcher D, Maurette P, Sessler DI, Chauvin M. Remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia and its prevention with small-dose ketamine. Anesthesiology. 2005 Jul;103(1):147-55.

 

Kieffer BL, Evans CJ. Opioid tolerance-in search of the holy grail. Cell. 2002 Mar 8;108(5):587-90.

 

Koppert W. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia—–Pathophysiology and clinical relevance. Acute Pain. 2007;9:21-34.

 

Laulin JP, Maurette P, Corcuff JB, Rivat C, Chauvin M, Simonnet G. The role of ketamine in preventing fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia and subsequent acute morphine tolerance. Anesth Analg. 2002 May;94(5):1263-9, table of contents.

 

Mercadante S. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Advances in Palliative Medicine. Formerly: Polska Medycyna Paliatywna. 2006;5(2):76–81.

 

Richebé P, Rivat C, Rivalan B, Maurette P, Simonnet G.

[Low doses ketamine: antihyperalgesic drug, non-analgesic]. Ann Fr Anesth Reanim. 2005 Nov-Dec;24(11-12):1349-59.

 

Richebe P, Cahana A, Rivat C. Tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Is a divorce imminent? Pain. 2012 Aug;153(8):1547-8.

 

Silverman SM. Opioid induced hyperalgesia: clinical implications for the pain practitioner. Pain Physician. 2009 May-Jun;12(3):679-84.

 

OPIOID DEFINITION: Describes ALL compounds that work at the opioid receptors.

 

OPIATE DEFINITION: only naturally occurring alkaloids such as morphine or codeine

 

NARCOTIC DEFINITION (Gr. stupor): originally used to describe sleep-inducing medications, then opioids, but now is a LEGAL term to describe illicit substances.

 

OPIOID EQUIVALENCY

Aveline C, Roux AL, Hetet HL, Gautier JF, Vautier P, Cognet F, Bonnet F. Pain and recovery after total knee arthroplasty: a 12-month follow-up after a prospective randomized study evaluating Nefopam and Ketamine for early rehabilitation. Clin J Pain. 2014 Sep;30(9):749-54.

 

Basbaum AI, Bautista DM, Scherrer G, Julius D. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of pain. Cell. 2009 Oct 16;139(2):267-84.

 

Fine PG, Portenoy RK; Ad Hoc Expert Panel on Evidence Review and Guidelines for Opioid Rotation. Establishing "best practices" for opioid rotation: conclusions of an expert panel. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Sep;38(3):418-25.

 

GIG CYMRU NHS Wales. Bwrdd lechyd Aneurin Bevan Health Board. Opiate Conversion Doses. October 2010.

 

Gippsland Region Palliative Care Consortium Clinical Practice Group. Opioid Conversion Guidelines. Ratified July 2011, Reviewed August 2013.

 

McPherson ML. Introduction to Opioid Conversion Guidelines. In: Demystifying Opioid Conversion Calculations. A Guide for Effective Dosing. Bethesda, MD: American Society of Health System Pharmacists; 2010:4-7.

 

Patanwala AE, Duby J, Waters D, Erstad BL. Opioid conversions in acute care. Ann Pharmacother. 2007 Feb;41(2):255-66.

 

Pereira J, Lawlor P, Vigano A, Dorgan M, Bruera E. Equianalgesic dose ratios for opioids. a critical review and proposals for long-term dosing. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2001 Aug;22(2):672-87.

 

Shaheen PE, Walsh D, Lasheen W, Davis MP, Lagman RL. Opioid equianalgesic tables: are they all equally dangerous? J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Sep;38(3):409-17.

 

OPIOID METABOLISM

 

 

OPIOID PHARMACOLOGY

Trescot AM, Datta S, Lee M, Hansen H. Opioid pharmacology. Pain Physician. 2008 Mar;11(2 Suppl):S133-53.

 

OPIOID PHARMACOKINETICS

SHAFER

Davis MP, Pasternak GW. Opioid receptors and opioid pharmacodynamics. In: Davis MP, Glare PA, Hardy J, Quigley C, eds. Opioids in Cancer Pain. 2nd Ed. Oxford Medicine Online; 2009.

 

OXYCODONE

Lugo RA, Kern SE. The pharmacokinetics of oxycodone. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2004;18(4):17-30.

 

OXYMORPHONE

Adams MP, Ahdieh H. Pharmacokinetics and dose-proportionality of oxymorphone extended release and its metabolites: results of a randomized crossover study. Pharmacotherapy. 2004 Apr;24(4):468-76.

 

Hale ME, Ahdieh H, Ma T, Rauck R; Oxymorphone ER Study Group 1. Efficacy and safety of OPANA ER (oxymorphone extended release) for relief of moderate to severe chronic low back pain in opioid-experienced patients: a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. J Pain. 2007 Feb;8(2):175-84.

 

P450

Dean L. Codeine Therapy and CYP2D6 Genotype. In: Medical Genetics Summaries. Bethesda, MD: National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 2012.

 

Yee MM, Josephson C, Hill CE, Harrington R, Castillejo MI, Ramjit R, Osunkwo I. Cytochrome P450 2D6 polymorphisms and predicted opioid metabolism in African American children with sickle cell disease. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2013 Oct;35(7):e301-5.

 

Zhou SF. Polymorphism of human cytochrome P450 2D6 and its clinical significance: Part I. Clin Pharmacokinet. 2009;48(11):689-723.

 

PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON MEDICATIONS TO MANAGE OPIOID ADDICTION

Bryson EO. The perioperative management of patients maintained on medications used to manage opioid addiction. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2014 Jun;27(3):359-64.

 

PRURITUS

Charuluxananan S, Kyokong O, Somboonviboon W, Lertmaharit S, Ngamprasertwong P, Nimcharoendee K. Nalbuphine versus propofol for treatment of intrathecal morphine-induced pruritus after cesarean delivery. Anesth Analg. 2001 Jul;93(1):162-5.

 

Friedman JD, Dello Buono FA. Opioid antagonists in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation and pruritus. Ann Pharmacother. 2001 Jan;35(1):85-91.

 

Jannuzzi R. Nalbuphine for the treatment of opioid-induced pruritus: a systematic review. J Pain. 2013 April;14(4):S10.

 

Kjellberg F, Tramèr MR. Pharmacological control of opioid-induced pruritus: a quantitative systematic review of randomized trials. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2001 Jun;18(6):346-57.

 

Ko MC, Husbands SM. Effects of atypical kappa-opioid receptor agonists on intrathecal morphine-induced itch and analgesia in primates. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2009 Jan;328(1):193-200.

 

Larijani GE, Goldberg ME, Rogers KH. Treatment of opioid-induced pruritus with ondansetron: report of four patients. Pharmacotherapy. 1996 Sep-Oct;16(5):958-60.

 

Reich A, Szepietowski JC. Opioid-induced pruritus: an update. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2010 Jan;35(1):2-6.

 

Szarvas S, Harmon D, Murphy D. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review. J Clin Anesth. 2003 May;15(3):234-9.

 

PUBLIC HEALTH

Okie S. A flood of opioids, a rising tide of deaths. N Engl J Med. 2010 Nov 18;363(21):1981-5.

 

SLEEP

Cronin AJ, Keifer JC, Davies MF, King TS, Bixler EO. Postoperative sleep disturbance: influences of opioids and pain in humans. Sleep. 2001 Feb 1;24(1):39-44.

 

Dimsdale JE, Norman D, DeJardin D, Wallace MS. The effect of opioids on sleep architecture. J Clin Sleep Med. 2007 Feb 15;3(1):33-6.

 

Wang D, Teichtahl H. Opioids, sleep architecture and sleep-disordered breathing. Sleep Med Rev. 2007 Feb;11(1):35-46.

 

Webster LR, Choi Y, Desai H, Webster L, Grant BJ. Sleep-disordered breathing and chronic opioid therapy. Pain Med. 2008 May-Jun;9(4):425-32.

 

TRAMADOL

Vergnion M, Degesves S, Garcet L, Magotteaux V. Tramadol, an alternative to morphine for treating posttraumatic pain in the prehospital situation. Anesth Analg. 2001 Jun;92(6):1543-6.

 

PCA

Carstensen M, Møller AM. Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: a qualitative review of randomized trials. Br J Anaesth. 2010 Apr;104(4):401-6.

 

Elia N, Lysakowski C, Tramèr MR. Does multimodal analgesia with acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, or selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and patient-controlled analgesia morphine offer advantages over morphine alone? Meta-analyses of randomized trials. Anesthesiology. 2005 Dec;103(6):1296-304.

 

Felden L, Walter C, Harder S, Treede RD, Kayser H, Drover D, Geisslinger G, Lötsch J. Comparative clinical effects of hydromorphone and morphine: a meta-analysis. Br J Anaesth. 2011 Sep;107(3):319-28.

 

Grass JA. Patient-controlled analgesia. Anesth Analg. 2005 Nov;101(5 Suppl):S44-61.

 

Hicks RW, Sikirica V, Nelson W, Schein JR, Cousins DD. Medication errors involving patient-controlled analgesia. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2008 Mar 1;65(5):429-40.

 

Lehmann KA. Recent developments in patient-controlled analgesia. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005 May;29(5 Suppl):S72-89.

 

Lin TF, Yeh YC, Lin FS, Wang YP, Lin CJ, Sun WZ, Fan SZ. Effect of combining dexmedetomidine and morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. Br J Anaesth. 2009 Jan;102(1):117-22.

 

Marret E, Kurdi O, Zufferey P, Bonnet F. Effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on patient-controlled analgesia morphine side effects: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Anesthesiology. 2005 Jun;102(6):1249-60.

 

Momeni M, Crucitti M, De Kock M. Patient-controlled analgesia in the management of postoperative pain. Drugs. 2006;66(18):2321-37.

 

Pasero C, McCaffery M. Orthopaedic postoperative pain management. J Perianesth Nurs. 2007 Jun;22(3):160-72; quiz 172-3.

 

Sam WJ, MacKey SC, Lötsch J, Drover DR. Morphine and its metabolites after patient-controlled analgesia: considerations for respiratory depression. J Clin Anesth. 2011 Mar;23(2):102-6.

 

Sveticic G, Eichenberger U, Curatolo M. Safety of mixture of morphine with ketamine for postoperative patient-controlled analgesia: an audit with 1026 patients. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Jul;49(6):870-5.

 

Meds + Opioids = Sedation

Pain Education Programs

Scope of Education

Despite the prominence and the availability of resources and guidelines from national and international pain societies (American Pain Society; International Association for the Study of Pain), under-treatment of pain remains a widespread challenge. The source of pain management gaps are complex, both at the level of individual providers and at a systems level. Practice gaps include: inadequate understanding of pain assessment scales and appropriate use of analgesic medications, failure to assess and reassess pain in a systematic fashion, fear of producing iatrogenic addiction, concern about analgesic side effects (respiratory depression, hepatic, GI and renal dysfunction) and inability to differentiate opioid tolerance from physical dependence and addiction (Murnion BP et al. Pain Med. 2010 Jan;11(1):58-66. Epub 2009 Nov 17).

Many of these barriers are due to a combination of gaps in knowledge base and at the institutional level due to a failure to embrace an interprofessional model of pain management. A systematic review of the literature suggests that interprofessional education (IPE) is promising as an interventional tool for developing effective pain management skills (Satterfield JM, et al. Acad Med. 2004 Jan;79(1):6-15). As hosted by the Division of Pain Medicine, this website is intended as a tool to address this challenge by establishing a platform for meaningful collaborations across all four professional health science schools at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and beyond.

 

education_coepe_cert.png

UCSF Center of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE)

UCSF Center of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE) 2012-2013

The National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium has selected 12 health professional schools as designated Centers of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPEs). The CoEPEs will act as hubs for the development, evaluation, and distribution of pain management curriculum resources for medical, dental, nursing and pharmacy schools to enhance and improve how health care professionals are taught about pain and its treatment.

2012-2013 CoEPE Certificate of Award

Learning Modules

NIH CoEPE Curriculum Resources

Newsletters

UCSF CoEPE Newsletter, Year 1, Issue 1​
UCSF CoEPE Newsletter, Year 1, Issue 2

CoEPE Listing

UCSF CoEPE Organization & Leadership

Hawgood.pngSam Hawgood, MBBS
Chancellor, UCSF
UCSF

 

Schumacher_0.pngMark Schumacher, PhD, MD
Principal Investigator
UCSF

 

Basbaum.pngAllan Basbaum, PhD
Content Expert
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Sarah Brynelson, RN, MS, CNS, CPAN, 
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Peter Goadsby, MD, PhD
Content Expert
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Masters.pngSusan Masters, PhD
Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education, Curriculum Advisor
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Lowenstein.pngDaniel Lowenstein, MD
Curriculum Advisor
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Satterfield.pngJason Satterfield, PhD
Curriculum Advisor
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Reeves.pngScott Reeves, PhD, MSc, PGCE
Director, UCSF Center for Interprofessional Education, Curriculum Advisor
UCSF Center for Interprofessional Education

 

VanSchaik.pngSandrijn Van Schaik, MD
Director, UCSF Kanbar Center for Simulation, Clinical Skills and Telemedicine Education
UCSF Kanbar Center for Simulation, Clinical Skills and Telemedicine Education

 

Guglielmo.pngB. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD
Dean, Curriculum Advisor
UCSF School of Pharmacy

 

Sherilyn VanOsdol, PharmD, BCPS
Lead Faculty
UCSF School of Pharmacy

 

Brock.pngTina Brock, EdD, MS, BSPharm
Curriculum Advisor
UCSF School of Pharmacy

 

Vlahov.pngDavid Vlahov, RN, PHD, FAAN
Curriculum Advisor
UCSF School of Nursing

 

Miaskowski.pngChristine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN
Lead Faculty, Lead Case Faculty and Content Expert
UCSF School of Nursing

 

Featherstone.pngJohn Featherstone, PhD
Dean, Curriculum Advisor
UCSF School of Dentistry

 

Levine.pngJon Levine, MD, PhD
Lead Faculty and Content Expert
UCSF School of Dentistry

 

Scott Steiger, MD
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Lori Reisner, PharmD
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Pharmacy

 

Topp.pngKimberly Topp, PhD, PT
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Jill Gleason, PT
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Guidice.pngLinda Giudice, MD, PhD
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Priscilla Abercrombie, RN, PhD, WHNP
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Shimotake.pngThomas Shimotake, MD
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Franck.pngLinda Franck, RN, PhD, FAAN
Lead Case Faculty, Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Zwass.pngMaurice Zwass, MD
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Rempel.pngDavid Rempel, MD, MPH
Lead Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Chris Pasero, MS, RN-BC, FAAN
Case Faculty, Content Expert
Independent Consultant

 

Stannard.pngDaphne Stannard, RN, PhD, CCRN
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Nursing

 

Adam Cooper, RN, BSN, MSN
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Nursing

 

Octavia Plesh, DDS, MS
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Dentistry

 

Charles McNeill, DDS
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Dentistry

 

Patricia Rudd, PT
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Mehling.pngWolf Mehling, MD
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Chesney.pngMargaret Chesney, PhD
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Shelley Adler, PhD
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Coffa.pngDiana Coffa, MD
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Widera.pngEric Widera, MD
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Pantilat.pngSteven Pantilat, MD 
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Naidu.pngRamana Naidu, MD, 
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Pullins.pngJessica Pullins, PhD, 
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Sanjay Reddy, MD, 
Case Faculty
UCSF School of Medicine

 

Adam Jacobson 
IT Consultant

Pain Education Applicants

Undergraduate Medical Education Opportunities

UCSF Anesthesia & Perioperative Care Pain Management Clerkship​ 
This course in pain management allows students to participate in the assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pain in an outpatient setting.
For more information and a full Anesthesia Clerkships course list, please visit:
UCSF Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care
UCSF Undergraduate Medical Education

For specific information for visiting students:
UCSF Undergraduate Medical Education - Visiting Students

For any other information, please contact:
Marie Lim
Anesthesia Clerkship Programs Coordinator
Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care
University of California, San Francisco
Email: [email protected]

Graduate Medical Education Opportunities

INTERNS
The interdisciplinary Anesthesia internship program at UCSF is a rigorous yet richly rewarding year that includes intensive training in internal medicine, surgery, critical care, neurology, and emergency medicine alongside some of the finest physicians in the country. To gain pain management experience, interns may elect to rotate through our UCSF Pain Management Center and Inpatient Acute Pain Services.

RESIDENTS
The UCSF Pain Management Center welcomes any resident who would like to rotate through the clinic. Coordination with the UCSF Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care Residency Program is required for both visiting and UCSF trainees.
Applicants who would like to apply for a full Anesthesia Internship or Residency must complete an ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) application.

For more information, please contact:
Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care
University of California, San Francisco
Email: [email protected]

FELLOWS
UCSF Pain Medicine Fellowship training consists of 12 months of full-time training after satisfactory completion of a core ACGME accredited residency program.
UCSF Pain Medicine Fellowship Program Overview
Pain Medicine Fellowship Application
The UCSF Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program is a one-year ACGME-accredited clinical fellowship devoted to training future leaders in all areas of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.
UCSF Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program Overview
Applicants interested in pursuing training with the UCSF Palliative Medicine Fellowship should follow the instructions via the ERAS Fellowship Documents Office. More information can be found at UCSF Graduate Medical Education.
Inter-program training between the Pain Medicine Fellowship and Palliative Care Fellowship Programs are under discussion.

Other Educational Opportunities

Observational preceptorships of varying lengths are also available. Visiting physicians, scientists, physician's assistants, physical therapists, pharmaceutical representatives, and others have joined us in this capacity. No direct patient care is permitted.

To apply, please contact:
Mario De Pinto, MD
Medical Director, UCSF Pain Management Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pain Fellowships

Pain Medicine Fellowship Programs

ACGME Approved Chronic Pain Medicine Fellowship

The Joint Commission Approved Pain Management Center

pasvankas__george_william2.jpg
George Pasvankas, MD
Fellowship Director

FROM THE DIRECTOR
The UCSF Pain Management Center specializes in the multidisciplinary management of patients suffering from acute, chronic, and cancer pain. The faculty consists of the Medical Director, the Administrative Director, the Fellowship Director, anesthesiologists, neurologists, psychologists, physical therapists, nurses, administrative staff, and consultants in Orthopedic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Neurology, Rheumatology, Radiology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, and Pharmacology. 

 

ACGME Approved Acute Pain and Regional Anesthesiology Fellowship

Pedram Aleshi, MD

Fellowship Director

FROM THE DIRECTOR
The UCSF Acute Pain and Regional Anesthesiology Fellowship is one of the first in the nation, with only 8 other institutions offering this ACGME approved fellowship in 2017. This fellowship includes structured acute and chronic pain rotations at UCSF Helen Diller Medical Center at Parnassus Heights, UCSF Mission Bay, some at Kaiser South San Francisco and some at ZSFG. It includes an increased emphasis on acute pain and on multimodal pharmacologic approaches to treat it. “We have a much larger arsenal of tools to treat pain after complex surgeries, and with the opiate crisis, this is especially important,” says Dr. Aleshi. “Using that arsenal effectively demands another level of expertise and our fellows will be much better trained in this aspect of treating pain.” 

 

To Read More, Please visit our Fellowships page 

Current Trainees

Resources for Current Trainees

ML APS/M-PN Resident Orientation July 2018

 

Mount Zion Adult Chronic Pain Rotation (Z-PN)

When: 7am arrival on your first day of rotation (Monday)

Where: UCSF Pain Management Center (PMC) at 2255 Post Street, MZ campus

Z-PN Rotation Welcome Letter_January 2018

Medical student PMC rotation handbook 2015

UCSF-PMC-Survival-Guide 2017

 

UCSF Anesthesia Medical Student Clerkships

Medical student PMC rotation handbook 2015

Pain Research

Research in the Division of Pain Medicine

For up-to-date research lectures and more, check the Events section of the Anesthesia and Perioperative Care website. To see a list of all UCSF Pain Research Group lectures, please click here or see the Pain Research Group link at the left side of this page.
For more information, or to be added to the Pain Research Group's email distribution list, please contact:
Julie Leong
Research Administration Analyst
UCSF Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care
Email: [email protected]

Instructions for Research Study Participants

Verbal Instructions for Quantitative Sensory Test for Adults (English)

Verbal Instructions for Quantitative Sensory Test for Children (English)

Written Instructions for Quantitative Sensory Test for Adults (English)

Written Instructions for Quantitative Sensory Test for Children (English)

UCSF Pain Research Group

UCSF Pain Research Group Schedule

Date Speaker Institution Presentation Recordings

Sep 28, 2017
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721                               

Jose Moron-  Concepcion, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of Anesthesiology
Department of Neuroscience

Washington University Pain Center
Washington University School of Medicine
"Opioid-Induced Plasticity and the Intersection with Pain" Click Here
Oct 26, 2017
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Yeong-Ray Wen

Attending Anesthesiologist
Associate Professor
Department of Anesthesiology

China Medical University Hospital
China Medical University
Taichung, Taiwan
"Pulse Radio Frequency Ablation of DRG to Treat Chronic Pain" Click Here

Nov 16, 2017
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-217

Franziska Denk, MSc

Lecturer
Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases

King's College London "What Cell Sorting Can Teach Us About Pain and Neuro-Immune Interactions" Click Here
Apr 4, 2018
5:00PM-6:00PM
S-170

Jianren Mao, MD, PhD

Chief, Division of Pain Medicine
Vice Chair for Research
Direction, MGH Center for Translational Pain Research

Massachusetts General Hospital "Current Challenges in Translational Pain Research"  
June 14, 2018
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721
Prasad Shirvalkar, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor Department of Anesthesiology (Pain Management) Department of Neurology
University of California, San Francisco "Closing the Loop on Deep Brain Stimulation for Chronic Pain"  
October 18, 2018
8:00AM-9:00AM
HSW302

Thomas Buchheit, MD            Chief of Pain Medicine
Center for Translational Pain Medicine
Associate Professor
Department of Anesthesiology

 

Duke University  "Nerve Injury, Arthritis, and the Future of Biologic Therapies for Pain"

 

 

January 10, 2019
8:00AM-9:00AM
N721
Greg Scherrer, PhD, PharmD
Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Neurosurgery, and by courtesy, Molecular and Cellular Physiology

 

Stanford University TBA  

TBA
5:00PM-6:00PM
Rm: TBA

Irene Tracey, MA (Oxon), Dphil., FRCA, FMedSci
Head of Department & Nuffield Chair in Anaesthetic Science

Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

University of Oxford TBA  
         

TBA
8:00AM-9:00AM
Rm: TBA

Stephen McMahon
Professor of Physiology, Director of London Pain Consortium

 
King’s College TBA  

 

2016 - 2017 UCSF Pain Research Group Schedule

Date

Speaker Institution  Presentation  Recordings

Aug 29, 2016
8:00AM-
9:00AM
N-721

Frank Porreca, PhD
Professor of Pharmacology
Associate Department Head, Department of Pharmacology

University of Arizona "Brain Circuits Mediating Pain and Its Relief" Click Here

Nov 10, 2016
8:00AM-
9:00AM
N-721

Hui-Lin Pan, MD, PhD
Helen T. Hawkins Distinguished Professor and 
Deputy Division for Head for Research
Anesthesiology and Critical Care
Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

"Epigenetic and Synaptic Mechanisms of Neuropathic Pain" Click Here
Dec 8, 2016
8:00AM-
9:00AM
N-721

David Bennett, MB PhD, FRCP
Professor of Neurology and Neurobiology
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences
Senior Wellcome Clinical Scientist
Honorary Consultant Neurologist

University of Oxford "Human Pain Channelopathies" Click Here
Feb 23, 2017
8:00AM-
9:00AM
N-721

Donald Manning, MD, PhD
Chief Medical Officer

Adynxx "Found in Translation" - Transcription Factor Targeting for Pain Management and Prevention Click Here
Mar 9, 2017
8:00AM-
9:00AM
N-721

Theodore Price, PhD
Associate Professor
Neurobiology of Pain, Molecular Mechanisms 
of Plasticity, Neuropharmacology

University of Texas at Dallas "Translation Regulation in Chronic Pain: Targeting Translation from the 5' and 3' Ends and New Insight from New Generation Sequencing" Click Here
Mar 21, 2017
5:00PM-
6:00PM
N-721

Lawrence Poree, MD, PhD
Clinical Professor
Anesthesia and Perioperative Care

University of California, San Francisco "Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Neuralgia: Case Presentations and Results of Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trail" Click Here
RESCHEDULED
Mar 22, 2017

Quinn Hogan, MD
Professor of Anesthesiology
Director, Anesthesia Pain Research
Chair, Departmental Rank and Tenure Committee

Medical College of Wisconsin "The Sensory Neuron T-junction is a Natural Impulse Filter and a Potential Therapeutic Target"  

Apr 20, 2017
8:00AM-
9:00AM
N-217 *
*Note different location

Andrew Todd
Professor of Neuroscience

University of Glasgow "Defining the Roles of Dorsal Horn Interneurons in the Spinal Processing of Pain and Itch"  

May 25, 2017
8:00AM-
9:00AM
HSW-303*
*Note different location

Qiufu Ma, PhD
Professor of Neurobiology

Harvard Medical School
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
TBA

 

2015 - 2016 UCSF Pain Research Group Schedule

Date Speaker Institution Presentation Recordings
Nov 12, 2015
8:00AM-9:00AM 
N-721

Neil Schwartz, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Neurology

University of California, San Francisco "Striatal Regulation of the Impact of Pain on Reward-Directed Behavior" Click Here

Dec 3, 2015
8:00AM-
9:00AM
N-721  

Michael Rowbotham, MD
Pain Management Center Neurologist
Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care

University of California, San Francisco Patient Presentation Click Here
Jan 14, 2016
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Jeffrey Mogil, PhD 
Professor
Canada Research Chair in Genetics of Pain
E.P. Taylor Chair in Pain Studies

McGill University
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
"Sex Differences in Pain from Both Sides of the Syringe" Click Here
Feb 11, 2016
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

John Neubert, DDS, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics
Affiliate Associate Professor, Department of Neuroscience

University of Florida "Operant Assessments of Orofacial Pain (Building a Better Mouse Trap)" Click Here
Apr 14, 2016
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Gregory Scherrer, PhD

Assistant Professor
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Neurosurgery
Molecular & Cellular Physiology

Stanford University
School of Medicine
"Molecular Mechanisms of Pain Modulation by Endogenous  and Exogenous Opiods"  

May 12, 2016
8:00AM-9:00AM
Location: TBA

Xinzhong Dong, PhD
Professor
Department of Neuroscience

Xinzhong Dong, PhD
Professor
Department of Neuroscience

"Mechanisms of Pain and Itch" Click Here

2014 - 2015 UCSF Pain Research Group Schedule

Date     Speaker  Institution Presentation Recordings

Dec 4, 2014
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

William Schmidt, PhD
President, NorthStar Consulting, LLC VP, Centrexion Corp VP, 
Cap Genesis, LLC VP, EicOsis, LLC

NorthStar Consulting, LLC

"Standing on the Shoulders of Giants:
Innovations in Analgesic Drug Development"

Click Here

Jan 22, 2015
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Andrew Charles, MD
Professor
Meyer and Renee Luskin Chair in 
Migraine and Headache Studies
Director, Headache Research and 
Treatment Program
Department of Neurology

University of California, 
Los Angeles
"Advances in the Basic and Clinical Science of Migraine" Click Here

Feb 26, 2015
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Mark Schumacher, MD, PhD
Professor and Chief
Division of Pain Medicine
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care

University of California,
San Francisco
"Chronification of Pain: The Role of Sp1-like Transcription Factors" Click Here

Apr 9, 2015
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Bradley Taylor, PhD
Professor
Department of Physiology

University of Kentucky "Endogenous Opioid Receptor Analgesia and Dependence" Click Here

Apr 30, 2015*
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721
*Date updated

Yves De Koninck, PhD
Professor, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Scientific Director, Quebec Mental Health Institute

Laval University
Quebec City, Canada
"Targeting Chloride Transport for the Treatment of Chronic Pain" Click Here

May 7, 2015
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Michael Rowbotham, MD
Professor
Pain Management

University of California, 
San Francisco
"Case Presentation" Click Here

May 21, 2015
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Cheryl Stucky, PhD
Professor
Director, Neuroscience Doctoral 
Program

Medical College of Wisconsin "Mechanisms Underlying Pain in Sickle Cell Disease" Click Here

2013 - 2014 UCSF Pain Research Group Schedule

Date  Speaker Institution Presentation Recordings

Dec 5, 2013
8:00AM-9:00AM   
HSW - 301

Bruce Hammock, PhD
Distinguished Professor
Department of Entomology and 
UCD Comprehensive Cancer Center

University of California, 
Davis
"Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors Reduce Neuropathic Pain 
in Diabetic Models 
and in Companion Animals"
Click Here

Jan 16, 2014
8:00AM-9:00AM
HSW - 300

Merlin Larson, MD
Recalled Faculty/Academic Specialist
Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care

University of California,
San Francisco

"Opioid Effect on Pupillary Unrest - Theory and Clinical Application" Click Here

Mar 6, 2014
8:00AM-9:00AM
HSW - 300

Robert Gereau, PhD
Professor of Anesthesiology
Chief, Basic Research Division

Washington University 
Pain Center
"Translational Pain Research: Targeting Central Sensitization" Click Here

Apr 24, 2014
8:00AM-9:00AM
Location: N-721

Ru Rong Ji, PhD
Professor of Anesthesiology
Professor of Neurobiology
Chief of Pain Research

Duke University Medical
Center
"Neuroinflammation Drives Chronic Pain" Click Here

May 8, 2014
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Tor Wager, PhD
Associate Professor of
Psychology and Neuroscience

University of Colorado,
Boulder
"Towards fMRI-Based Biomarkers for Pain and Emotion" Click Here

Jun 5, 2014
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-721

Zhonghui Guan, MD
Anesthesiologist and Pain 
Management Specialist
Pain Management Center at UCSF

University of California,
San Francisco
"How Do Injured DRG Neurons Activate Microglia and Contribute
to Neuropathic Pain"
Click Here

2012 - 2013 UCSF Pain Research Group Schedule

Date   Speaker Institution  Presentation Recordings

Nov 29, 2012
8:00AM-9:00AM
Cole Hall

Tomoyuki Kawamata, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Anesthesiology & Resuscitology

Shinshu University
School of Medicine
Mastsumoto City, Japan

"TRPV1 and TRPV2 Detect Different Modalities 
of Bone Cancer Pain"

 

 

Dec 6, 2012
8:00AM-9:00AM
Cole Hall

Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD
Department of Anatomy, UCSF
Department of Neurosurgery, Cedars Sinai

Cedars Sinai Medical Center "How Significant is Non-Synaptic Transmission?
Very Significant in the Sensory Ganglion"
 

Jan 10, 2013
8:00AM-9:00AM
HSW-301

Pamela Palmer MD, PhD
Chief Medical Officer

AcelRx Pharmaceuticals
Redwood City, CA

"Sublingual Sufentanil NanoTab PCA System for
Postoperative Pain Management"
Click here

Feb 7, 2013
8:00AM-9:00AM
HSW-301

Tony Yaksh, PhD
Professor and Vice Chair for Research
Department of Anesthesiology
Professor of Pharmacology

University of California,
San Diego
San Diego, CA

"Spinal Toll Receptors in Nociceptive Signaling 
and the Development of Chronic Pain"

Click here

Mar 28, 2013
8:00AM-9:00AM
Toland Hall

Kenneth Hargreaves, DDS, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Endodontics
President's Council Endowed Chair in Research

University of Texas
Health Science Center
at San Antonio
San Antonio, TX

"Wham, Bam, OLAMs - Studies on the Role of Endogenous TRPV1 Agonists"

Click here

May 16, 2013

Pain Summit

 

 

 

Jun 6, 2013
8:00AM-9:00AM
N-729

Mark Zylka, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Cell Biology & Physiology

University of North Carolina
School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, NC

"Sensory Mechanism for Heat Inhibition of Cold" Click here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pain Management Center (PMC) Outpatient Pain Clinic

The UCSF Pain Management Center, located at the UCSF Mount Zion campus, was established in 1987 by the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care to help patients with various stages and types of complex, acute, and chronic pain. We offer a variety of treatment options with a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach.

 

 

Contact

UCSF Pain Management Center
2255 Post Street
San Francisco, CA 
94143-1654
(Express mail ZIP 94115)

Phone: 415.885.PAIN (7246)
Fax: 415.885.7575
Fax for New Patient Referrals: 415.885.3883 

Our Center

Combines traditional and complementary approaches

  • Was designated as a Clinical Center of Excellence in Pain Management in 2007 by the American Pain Society
  • Empowers patients through education about their conditions
  • Identifies the best methods to relieve pain, promote healing, and restore maximum levels of function
  • Has extensive knowledge of the latest pain management treatments and techniques
  • Averages about 800 patient visits per month

Our Center provides pain treatment for a wide variety of conditions, including but not limited to:

wikiman_1m80_2.gif

Chronic pain is a multifaceted medical problem that affects all aspects of a patient’s life. Our Center is staffed by professionals from multiple disciplines, including Anesthesia, Neurology, Psychology, and Nursing to address the range of issues brought about by pain. Patient involvement and education are important components of our program. 

Map and Directions

Pathway is your guide to getting directions to UCSF at Parnassus Heights, UCSF at Mount Zion, and UCSF at Mission Bay and China Basin. 

Referral Information

The UCSF Pain Management Center is a consultative practice and all patients must be referred for consultation by their primary care physician or other health care provider.

NON-UCSF REFERRING PROVIDERS:
Please complete the UCSF Pain Referral and fax to us at (415) 885-3883.

UCSF REFERRING PROVIDERS:
Please complete a referral within APeX

ALL REFERRING PROVIDERS:
Along with a completed referral form, please include:

  • Reason for referral
  • Most recent medical evaluations
  • Most recent operative reports
  • Most recent X-ray/MRI reports
  • Any psychological evaluations or reports
  • A list of the patient’s current medications
  • If required by the patient’s insurance, the authorization for the referral to the PMC

Evaluation Process:

  • We receive your referral
  • We contact the patient and schedule them for an initial evaluation
  • We send the patient an appointment confirmation letter, with:

Once we have evaluated the patient, the referring provider will be sent a copy of our evaluation summary, treatment plan & recommendations. If you need additional info, please contact us at (415) 885-7347.

Treatments and Recommendations

We will provide recommendations about the proposed treatment or suggested medication regimen to the referring provider.
If required by the patient’s insurance, we will secure prior authorization for recommended treatments prior to scheduling the patient’s appointment.

 

Pain Psychology Resources

Pain Psychology Services Available

Biofeedback
Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment
Family Education and Support
Group Psychotherapy
Health Psychology
Individual Psychotherapy
Interdisciplinary Management Of Chronic Pain Syndromes
Psychological Evaluation
Psychological Treatment
Stress Management

Osher Mini Medical School for the Public Lecture

Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice
 
Integrated Pediatric Pain and Palliative Care (IP3)

Integrated Pediatric Pain and Palliative Care (IP3)

Scope of Services

IP3 is a combined service staffed with pediatric anesthesiologists, pediatric integrative pain specialists, and pediatric palliative care specialists. Nurse practitioners bridge services along with Child Life and pharmacy support.

 

IP3 provides comprehensive acute and chronic pain management for pediatric patient populations in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The outpatient IP3 practice is known as the Integrated Pediatric Pain and Palliative Care Clinic, and is located at the UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building at 1825 Fourth Street, on the Fifth floor, in suite 5A.

 

IP3 provides expert pain medicine care and consultative services across the Benioff Children’s Hospital and works collaboratively with providers across disciplines. This includes intradepartmental coordination with the faculty and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Anesthesia and interdepartmentally with the Dept. of Pediatrics and the Chief of the Division of Hospital Medicine. The spectrum of pain management therapies are offered, from biofeedback and acupuncture to epidurals and regional nerve blocks. IP3 is seen as an innovative approach to provide the best possible care for the pediatric population that we serve at UCSF.

 

Both the adult and pediatric pain services are available 24 hours/day.

 

Location

UCSF Ron Conway Family Gateway Medical Building
Integrated Pediatric Pain & Palliative Care Clinics
1825 Fourth Street, Fifth floor, 5A
San Francisco, CA 94143-0106
(415) 353-1328 Phone
(415) 353-3729 Fax

IP3 Logistics

  • Pager: 443-6100
  • APeX Consult: IP-3 Consult
  • OK to consult for specific services (e.g. acupuncture only) or for full evaluation (pain and palliative care services)
  • Can continue to follow patients post discharge

IP3 Structure

  • Combined service staffed with pediatric anesthesiologists, pediatric integrative pain specialists, and pediatric palliative care specialists
  • Nurse practitioners to bridge services
  • Child Life and Pharmacy support

IP3 Offerings (Pain)

  • Support for pain medication management (opiates, non-opiates, PCA, adjunctive meds)
  • Post-operative and interventional pain control (epidurals, regional nerve blocks, etc)
  • Outpatient Pediatric Pain Clinic
  • Integrative modalities for pain and other symptoms (acupuncture, acupressure, biofeedback, art and music therapy, canine companion)

IP3 Offerings (Palliative Care)

  • Outpatient Complex Care Clinic
  • Coordination of home hospice care
  • Coordination of end-of-life care
  • Family and staff bereavement support

From UCSF News

Acupuncture Helps Pediatric Patients Manage Pain and Nausea UCSF is One of Few Academic Medical Centers to Offer Treatment to Inpatients and Outpatients

From UCSF Leaps and Bounds

Zapping the Pain

 

News and Events

UCSF Pain Research Group Lectures

For up-to-date research lectures and more, check the Events section of the Anesthesia and Perioperative Care website. To see a list of all UCSF Pain Research Group lectures, please click here or see the Pain Research Group link at the left side of this page.
For more information, or to be added to the Pain Research Group's email distribution list, please contact:
Julie Leong
Research Administration Analyst
UCSF Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care
Email: [email protected]

Anesthesia Grand Rounds

For more information, please visit the "Events" section of the Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care website.

UCSF - Stanford Pain Education Exchange

For more information, please visit the "Events" section of the Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care website.

Chronic Pain Support Group

Pain X Class

 

Support Us

To make a secure donation online, please visit our make a gift page, select “Direct your gift to a specific area,” and choose [Division of Pain Medicine].

 

For more information, please contact:

 

Allison White 

Assistant Director, University Development

220 Montgomery Street, 5th Floor

San Francisco, CA 94104

 

Office Tel: (415) 502-5868

Email: [email protected]